Anselms ontological argument introduction

Descartes attempts to prove God's existence by arguing that there "must be some one thing that is supremely good, through which all good things have their goodness".

ontology

The traditional definition of an ontological argument was given by Immanuel Kant. A being that exists as an idea in the mind and in reality is, other things being equal, greater than a being that exists only as an idea in the mind. Plantinga argued that, although the first premise is not rationally established, it is not contrary to reason.

Suppose B is a being that instantiates all the perfections and suppose B doesn't exist in reality.

Anselm believes that existence in reality is

Both versions of Anselm's argument rely on the claim that the idea of God that is, a being than which none greater can be conceived "exists as an idea in the understanding. Paul Oppenheimer and Edward N. The claim that an unlimited being B exists at some world W clearly entails that B always exists at W that is, that B's existence is eternal or everlasting in W , but this doesn't clearly entail that B necessarily exists that is, that B exists at every logically possible world. Hartshorne says that, for Anselm, "necessary existence is a superior manner of existence to ordinary, contingent existence and that ordinary, contingent existence is a defect. Therefore, an omniscient, omnipotent and perfectly good being exists. There is no being, therefore, whose non-existence implies a contradiction. Aselm attempts to prove the existence of God through one single argument which is that God does truly exist. While also establishing that Anselms inferences found with his use of deduction and logical means to prove the existence of a higher being are indeed true. Kant rejects premise 3 on the ground that, as a purely formal matter, existence does not function as a predicate. Thus, if the notion of God did not include existence, it would not be supremely perfect, as it would be lacking a perfection. Aquinas had a second problem with the ontological argument.

But this contradicts the assumption that B is a being that instantiates all the perfections. Kant questions the intelligibility of the concept of a necessary being. He is conceived of as a being who could not be limited, that is, as an absolutely unlimited being. And only a claim that attributes a particular property can entail claims that attribute particular properties.

The claim that an unlimited being B exists at some world W clearly entails that B always exists at W that is, that B's existence is eternal or everlasting in Wbut this doesn't clearly entail that B necessarily exists that is, that B exists at every logically possible world.

However, there will always be dilemmas, conflicts or predicaments when it comes to such sensitive and personal topics such as the existence of God. Nothing is demonstrable, unless the contrary implies a contradiction.

ontological being
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Ontological Argument (Overview)